Welcome to Warning Zone

Warning Zone is a Leicester based charity dedicated to teaching life-skills and safeguarding children. Our mission is to deliver life-saving messages to children aged 10-11, catching them on a key transition in their lives as they venture into secondary schools, where they will meet new friends and are introduced to new experiences. At this age, children are given more independence and will be responsible for their actions, behaviours and decisions they make; both in their day to day life and online.

At our state-of-the-art facility, we aim to educate young people on understanding risks, peer pressure, anti-social behaviour and consequences. With the Internet and online presence being so widely accessed from young age, our new E-Safety zone educates children on cyber-bullying, grooming, scammers and much more.

An exciting and interactive tour of every-day scenarios and situations, teaching children how to stay safe and make the right decisions.

Visit Warning Zone’s very own funfair, where children can play interactive games and learn how to stay safe online.

We have taken our interactive E-Safety Zone on the road, with an hour-long show, jam packed with interesting and surprising information.

Our volunteer guides donate their precious time and are crucial to our phenomenal learning experiences.

Our wonderful supporters are integral to Warning Zone’s success. Learn more about them and the reasons behind their kind generosity.

Keep up to date and have fun whilst helping Warning Zone.

Warning Zone Is Proudly Supported By

Did you know that over 10,000 school children visit Warning Zone every single year? Once they have visited, we try to keep the children engaged and deliver something completely unique back at their classroom.

Aimed at an older audience of year 9’s, we take our interactive E-Safety Learning Zone on the road, with an hour-long, flexible show, jam packed with interesting and surprising information about online safety and risks.  Designed to get the children really thinking and master the art of staying safe online.

We take the atmosphere of Warning Zone and implement it into schools, with the capacity of delivering to an entire year group of up to 300 students.

Warning Zone on Twitter

Would you like to be the person that improves our communications and work with an amazing team to help keep children safe? Apply by Monday - it's a great job
https://www.charityjob.co.uk/jobs/warning-zone/communications-officer-and-roadcrew-assistant/758140?tsId=8

BBC One West Midlands 7.30am this morning - stressing the risk of open water and cold water swimming.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/live/bbcone
Don't jump in if you don't know it's safe.

Don’t take our word for it, hear from the children themselves

Warning Zone saves 10 year old girl and family from fire disaster

Thankfully, 10 year old Tallulah visited Warning Zone early this year as part of her Year 6 annual school trip. 20 days later everything she learned became invaluable when a fire started at her home.

Tallulah’s Mum told us:

‘It was early morning and we were all upstairs. Unbeknown to me, Tallulah’s sister had put a hair mask cap in the microwave downstairs, to heat up. She asked Tallulah to go down and get the cap for her which is when Tallulah opened the kitchen door to find the microwave on fire. 

As Tallulah was walking towards the kitchen door she could smell the smoke.  When she opened the door she could see the microwave had flames inside of it. Tallulah ran upstairs to tell me about the fire.  I have a disability which means I have problems with my mobility, so if Tallulah hadn’t alerted me in time the fire could have been a lot more serious.  We have fitted smoke alarms but the fire at that point was contained inside the microwave so the heat sensor in the kitchen had not been triggered.

We all went downstairs. I opened the kitchen door and flames were licking out of the microwave.  I shouted to the girls to get out of the front of the house because the smoke and the smell were quite bad.  Tallulah managed to open the front door and both her and her sister got out of the house. I managed to unplug the microwave and was about to get water but realised the smoke was overpowering and I had to get out immediately. I called 999 as I got out of the front of the house.  We were all still in our night clothes!

 Tallulah was very calm even though she was upset, and kept asking me if I was OK, saying that the house does not matter and the decorator can come and make it better (we had just finished decorating the house).  When the fire service had done their job and put the fire out, Tallulah said to me that she knew exactly what to do after visiting Warning Zone.  She told me that if the fire had been worse we needed to crawl on the floor because the smoke rises and breathing in the smoke can kill you.

At Warning Zone Tallulah learned about all kinds of risks and about the dangers of fire. Because of this she realised that she should touch the door with the back of her hand to see if there was any heat. She learnt how to recognise the fire, that she needed to tell an adult immediately, that she needed to get out of the house, that she needed to crawl if there was smoke, and that she needed to be calm. She did all of those things. She did not panic about her possessions and really helped me and her sister outside to remain calm.  She was the most positive one out of us all.

The first thing on Tallulah’s mind after the incident was what she had learned at Warning Zone.  We would like to thank Warning Zone for teaching Tallulah and her classmates how to stay safe.  Tallulah acted quickly and sensibly and due to her actions the fire was detected much sooner than it could have been and therefore we all got out safely and the damage was minimised. 

 Tallulah thoroughly enjoyed her day at Warning Zone and came home full of stories about what she had learnt.  She wrote a diary entry for school full of detail about how she would respond if she was ever at risk.  Little did we know that she would have to put those lessons into action so soon after her visit!’

The Wonderful Fire and Rescue Service in action at Tallulah’s house